Walking the bridge between usability and search engine optimization practices to enhance user experience since 2000.

36 Ecommerce Website Changes That Will Create An Instant Conversions List

36 Ecommerce Website Changes That Will Create An Instant Conversions List

Is your website ready for the holiday season?  Do you sell products online?  Are you sure your site is user friendly and persuasive?

The objective of this checklist is to provide you with assistance in making sure your website is ready to generate revenue.  Each item is intended to support your online marketing investment by increasing the overall usability for everyone who visits your site.  User experience design is most often considered an afterthought.  Truly successful websites include usability, user experience and customer experience design as part of their business requirements and plans for their online presence.

Remember – Every page is a “landing page”.

1. Help your website visitors make good decisions. Many people don’t know what they want. Help them make choices or browse longer. Most visitors just need a little extra incentive to make a purchase.

2. Use models of all shapes, ages and sizes for clothing sites. The images you select may turn away potential customers. For example, Victoria’s Secret neglects curvy women, plus size and women over 27 years old.

3. Choose crisp, clear images. Find ways to show the size of products. It is difficult to determine the size of a bird feeder, humidifier or compost bin without either reading a description or viewing a comparison picture. Provide close up details of craftsmanship. Show tread. Provide step by step images of custom work.

4. Online shoppers are unable to touch materials used for clothing, crafts, furniture, etc. Therefore, write product descriptions that describe every detail, including how it feels when touched, worn, and used.

5. Add real life use cases to promote sales. Technical sites with gadgets often forget that how we use devices is important to know. Can your products be used in the rain and snow? What is the average life span of a battery, roofing tile, light bulb? If a light bulb lasts 7 years, it is worth paying a little bit more for it.

6. Some people will not order online with a credit card. They will, however, use their PayPal account. Increase conversions by providing alternative payment methods.

7. Does your navigation inspire clicks? Be descriptive. Add categories. Men’s what? Plus size what? Absolutely avoid mystery links that don’t specify exactly where you are taking visitors. They don’t have time.

8. Look at how Amazon does their site search in the header. Visitors can search the site or by category or with keywords. Auto-complete functionality is also helpful. Your website has to function as the salesperson who is guiding a customer by making suggestions.

9. Add related topics, related items, favorites, testimonials, customer ratings, etc. to product pages.

10. Provide a newsletter with coupon codes, special deals, limited time specials, etc. Never require a phone number for a free newsletter.

11. Offer functions such as wish and favorites lists. Add a way to “Pin” items. This not only acts as a way to add to a personal wish list but advertises your products to others.

12. Membership has its benefits. Provide personalization and perks to increase the number of return customers and visits. Etsy and Amazon are examples that track customer orders and browsing history, which helps visitors with remembering and re-ordering.

13. Put vital information at the “point of action”. For example, place the return policy, shipping and warranties on the product page by inserting brief notes “No hassle returns” and “Free shipping”.

14. Provide examples for how your items are used and then place the call to action button nearby so that it can be ordered with ease. Consider a podcast along with visual and text stories.

15. Always provide navigation that communicates “sense of place” for your visitors, such as where they are, where they came from and where to go next. If a link is intended to take a visitor off the website, provide a warning in the link label that they are about to leave the site.

16. Answer questions at the point of action, point of sale, and inside landing pages. The moment you force a visitor to go hunt for information is the click of death for revenue.

17. Add content. Your products and services will not sell themselves. Describe features in image captions. What are the benefits, how to care for it (think fabric), etc. Add bullet points or tabbed menus for benefits, features, ingredients, comparisons, etc.

18. Create confidence by thinking of every possible concern a guest could have and respond to it with your site. How many days are left to ship? Can you rush it? Answer these questions within the content or product descriptions instead of a FAQ.

19. Provide proof of expertise and skills if you sell services and certain products like crafts online. This might be in the form of awards, customer feedback, ratings, interviews, and video demonstrations.

20. Place your specials, offers, products and promotions on the top half of every landing page and the homepage.

21. Replace your sliders with smaller images. Studies indicate that most sliders do not convert. Replace them with one or two static images, with a killer offer and big juicy call to action button. Reference: Carousels Don’t Convert

22. Update the Title and Meta description. Add a value proposition in the Meta description of each product page. Insert a trigger word such as “Free”, “Award winning”, “Top Rated” into the Title tag. The goal is to stand out in search engine results pages.

23. Review and spruce up your calls to action. Try changing colors for your buttons. Experiment and test color choices. Reference: The Science of Colors in Marketing

24. Navigation links are vital to your website. Without links, people would have no idea where you wish to go. Create momentum by adding action words to top level navigation such as “Explore Resources”, “Learn About Us”, and “Browse Services. Try including keywords and verbs, like “Learn about [my company name]”, “Browse Custom Furniture”, and “Explore Marketing Resources”.

25. Whenever possible, avoid stock photos. Choose “real life” pictures of products, or to help convey a mood, create desire or make an emotional connection with your customers.

26. Place a demonstration video into a page. However, do not set it to run automatically when the page loads. Allow site visitors to choose to watch it when they wish to. If it is used to sell a product, be sure you have a call to action button next to the video.

27. Review text content to be sure it is not too long and rambling. People scan rather than reading every word on a page. Shorten text, and chunk it up with smaller paragraphs and sub-headings.

28. Remove distractions from product landing pages. They know what they want, came to get it and your page must let them order it without any additional nonsense. Related items are okay. Advertisements are not.

29. Provide a site search near the page header or somewhere in the top half of every page for fast access.

30. If you have huge inventories, provide alternative search options such as A-Z search, drop down categories, search by brand, ratings, etc.

31. If you are out of stock on an item, provide a way to backorder it or show when it is available again. Provide a way for your customers to opt-in to receive an email when the product is re-stocked.

Accessibility

Several years ago the department store, Target, was sued because blind persons were unable to make purchases from their website. This was a wakeup call to ecommerce, and any website intending on being used by all people. Accessibility means that all people, no matter what their physical limitation may be, can use your website.

Ecommerce
This means that your website should be designed for people who wear glasses and contacts, are color blind, or may have trouble with lighting and color contrasts. It means that people with injured hands, hand and body tremors and carpel tunnel that makes using a mouse impossible, can still use your website. It means that screen reader software will work, so that people can listen to your website to use it. Design for special needs includes handicapped persons, deaf, blind, those with diseases that cause shaking, and people who are ADD or ADHD and find it difficult to stay focused while reading.

32. Check color contrasts in your text. Use this free color contrast tool. Poor color contrasts in your text content make it difficult to see and read your web pages.

33. Place Alt attributes behind images. Every image should contain an alt attribute that describes the image. Place your company or website name in an alt attribute behind your logo. Never stuff keywords into alt attributes. Reference: Alt Attributes WCAG2.0

34. Be careful when using animation or moving sliders on webpages that contain text that you want your visitors to read. If you insist on a slider, do not put it on automatic. Give your visitors control by allowing them to start and stop the images. Reference: Animation for Attention and Comprehension

35. Avoid colored text on colored backgrounds unless you have tested it for color contrasts. Gray text is a fad. Use black, dark green or dark blue for reading.

36. Never use black for a link color if your text content, headings and sub-headings are also black.

UX Futures – Unbelievably Affordable 1 Day Event

UX Futures – Unbelievably Affordable 1 Day Event

I enjoy, use and recommend Rosenfeld Media for learning the skills used in the usability and user interface/experience design profession.  Here is a unique opportunity to listen to usability thought leaders without the need to pack, board the pets and sit in cramped planes.

UX Futures is a one day event is held on November 5 and features a day of keynotes from some of the hottest thinkers and doers in the biz.  I had to re-read the fee five times.  It’s incredibly affordable for the caliber of information they will be providing that day.

Register here for UX Futures

Once in a while, it’s good to put down your wireframes and stylesheets, step back, and consider what’s next.

What might design work—and the designed world—look like in 10, 20 or 50 years? What role will we have in shaping that world? And when we look back at the impact of UX, will it be with pride or regret?

We’ve asked six brilliant thought leaders—each from very different corners of the UX world—to consider the future. Steve Krug, Jesse James Garrett, Nathan Shedroff, Abby Covert,Andy Polaine, and Margot Bloomstein will take you back and forth in time. They’ll inspire you to design for the future, and to design the future itself.

The Difference Between Usability and Yousability

The Difference Between Usability and Yousability

The term usability has suffered from an image problem that grows worse as time goes on while the demand for the work increases.

Sold Sign on New Home Lot

For us, there was no way to know in advance what the actual flavor of the neighborhood would be like, or what our relationship to it might be.

Try selling a methodology that has no strict standards conformance, is practiced a million different ways to Sunday, and has no concrete end product other than hope. When a CEO demands to know what possible good a usability audit will provide, the answer is not a sure thing because for starters, the action items have to be completed first.

And there as many of them as there are stars in the sky. Fortunately, there are strategies in place like Agile and Lean, or good old heuristics and cognitive walkthroughs with a dash of user testing. The scope of a usability project always starts with a plan and ends with more plans. Why?

Because a product, website or software application is never finished. It isn’t even about the fast pace of technology and the need to keep up with it to stay ahead of competitors. This is, however, as far as many companies bother to look. The CEO with investors dreams of being ahead of the pack but for most of them, once they come up with a new idea, 10 other top brands have already developed and marketed it. Never forget the dot.com crash.

Every innovation results in changes and consequences that were not expected. Facebook, in its inception, never planned on how it would make a mark in human society because there was no way of knowing how the Facebook experiment would work. It could not be tested before launch. Amazon burst into its own planet by making online purchasing easy for everyone. To do this, they reinvent themselves constantly. I can’t think of any other online business that works so hard to be the place that customers WANT to go first when looking for great deals. They nailed desire. Their website is busy as hell but who cares? They know what we want to buy, what we are willing to pay, and how to create the need to return for more.

This is not usability. It is not customer experience, or conversions or user experience or any of the other terms used to make website that work. This is YOUsability -the ability of a company to know you, your desires, your impulses, your loves, your habits, your devices, your dreams and your needs.

Usability is Not Ability for Everyone

There is no usability methodology that I am aware of that can prepare a company to do business with you, though by golly they do try. They design and test how you react. They create user personas and mental models. They hire user testing with people who may never use your site and get eye tracking and gaze studies to determine where some people look on a page and where they click. They track research and data to make business decisions. They scope out every nook and cranny of a plan that is locked into a business requirements document – an exercise that in reality is more than likely completely ignored. Most companies refuse to pay for any of what I just mentioned. They don’t see the return on this investment.

They don’t see the relationship between what they want to produce and its place among the masses of people they hope will use it. It’s as if you don’t exist but they are making something for some of you anyway. Every company I enter into a contract with has no interest in building a product that everyone can use. It would cost them too much. They narrow it down to:

First time user
Return user
Specific user categories like B2B, B2C

These are users.

The usability industry has been attempting to define itself for as long as I can remember (which for me would be 14 years). How do we use one word to define a mish-mish of solutions all attempting to assist with one central problem? Why did we drop the “Email the webmaster” link that existed in website footers in the 1990’s so we could find out what was not working?

You Are Not Part of the Plan

Breaking ground

A map does not include unknown possibilities and outcomes.

My husband and I recently moved into a new house in a new development. We bought early, grabbing a prime lot. All we had to look at were house plans and a map of the finished development of 90 homes. One day I asked our saleswoman if she could give me an idea of what our neighbors were like. She was not allowed to divulge that information but said it was diverse and she knew us enough to know we would be happy with the mixture of young families, retired people and those in-between. For us, there was no way to know in advance what the actual flavor of the neighborhood would be like, or what our relationship to it might be.

Your website, software and product are mapped out but your customers don’t know each other. You don’t know them either. They could create something together that you never ever dreamed possible. That companies are not willing to even invest in considering this is contributing to their failure.

Examining the experience beyond the whiteboard is not tangible so it is not considered. For all the hype about being “experience” oriented, the fact is that your experience is unknown and you are out of the loop because you don’t exist. You are a user. A piece of data.

It can cost millions to build a website product that does not work for the people who really need it. Healthcare.gov comes to mind. Clearly, running a successful website is no easy endeavor. There is never enough information to predict the outcome. But a company has to start somewhere and you can tell those that will invest in usability, user experience, customer experience, performance testing, software testing, information architecture, persuasive design, conversions, information architecture, user interface, user personas, user testing, gaze and click tracking, eye tracking, remote testing, focus groups, findability, accessibility, readability, searchability, human factors, and neuroscience vs those what will not spend a dime on anything but marketing strategies.

Convincing stakeholders to invest in usability is like asking them to purchase a who-done-it mystery novel. They are not interested in the adventure of the journey.

We need to find a way to convince them to open the book.

SEO Future Article Lacks Balance and Leadership

If you are a newcomer to SEO and read a recent article on the future of SEO you would discover there are 16 “expert, industry veterans” in SEO and they are men.

The article, Expert Insights On The Future Of SEO, Part 1, is taking some heat for its featuring men.

For me, the issue isn’t about gender. That was the trigger. The red balloon that escaped into the sky to make us all look up and take notice. The real pain point is the imbalance. The lack of leadership needed in an industry with boundless talent that continues to be represented by the same people slapping the same backs, beating the same drums.

According to some comments left in Part 1, several of the women who were contacted had specific reasons for not participating.  For example,

“I’ve been asked to provide detailed answers as quickly as possible “within 48 hours” so “businesses planning their 2015 budgets can use my input to lay foundations for future results”.

Another woman wrote,

“My first thought was they wanted me to lay out, in detail, what companies pay me to lay out.”

She is absolutely 100% correct in her assessment here. I no longer accept requests for these types of articles for the exact same reason. If a company needs expert advice, they should pay for the expert. A smart businessperson keeps the very best and valuable advice private, for use with paying clients.

The series, in my opinion, was an opinion fluff piece rather than an expert advice series.  From now until the end of the year and into next year the topic of looking into crystal balls will be popular.  What is the purpose of these articles?

Balanced rocksAgain, the balance is off.   What would drive a CEO, Founder or VIP to take the time to share expert advice?  Do they need the traffic and sales, brand reminder, and links?  They are already famous.  Was there no value in finding newcomers?

Clearly, Danny Sullivan is appalled at what has happened with the article. He already knows and understands the hurt women in SEO feel on a regular basis as they strive to find a seat in a male dominated industry. No doubt he will do whatever he can to fix this wrong.  But will he be working on repairing the correct wrong?

How many times a year do we have to see evidence of gender imbalance in a technical industry?  It’s an old fight that for most women in the SEO industry isn’t even the point.  What matters is finding leaders who make a difference.

Well written, authoritative articles boost the credibility and brand of the site that runs them. The strategy is to find skilled columnists who are not afraid to research and get quotes from experienced professionals. However, we see the same people interviewed over and over again.

Is there any interest in asking SEO professionals, who are not experts and veterans, how they may see the future of SEO? They may have a different set of expectations or perspectives not influenced by past practices. Perhaps they have invented their own strategies and have something new to teach us. It is an honor to be asked to participate in a series and it helps new people with their new companies to attract business.  Networking can be done in many ways, and one of them is by inviting a wide variety of people to participate in interviews and articles that feature various opinions and advice.

The best leaders are generous.  They are not vain, egotistical, greedy or unjust.  They know the value of providing all perspectives.  They listen with an open mind to all opinions, not just the elite, famous, well to do and successful people.  They value the skills brought to their industry by both genders.

When people don’t like something, they form their own group.  In the SEO industry there have been gatherings at conferences that are for women only.  There have been websites that feature just women in SEO. This signal went ignored by anyone in a leadership position but it provided a much needed way for the women in the SEO industry to meet and support each other.   It opened up new business opportunities. This new group divided from the greater group because it felt ignored and undervalued. These women wanted balance.  It was never about inequality or a battle of the sexes.

To me the fault of the article could be felt by anyone who values leadership and centered, balanced and unbiased information.

 

Hotjar Insights Provides Usability Testing Platform That Has It All

Finally, a usability testing suite with all the goodies packed into one application has arrived. Called HotJar, it is brand new and looking for you.

HotJar Insights has heatmap, polls, surveys, user testing, chat, and more. If you test websites and gather data from them, you likely are using at least 10 different tools. The top testing systems can be expensive, hard to learn, and take up lots of space on your computer. Add it up. It is long past time there is one platform, one price, one system to learn.

HotJar is in beta, looking for people to try it out. Here is one perk:

Funnel & Form Analysis:

Find the biggest opportunities for improvement and testing by identifying on which page and at which step most visitors are leaving your site. Improve online form completion rates by discovering which fields take too long to fill, which are left blank, and why your visitors abandon your form and page.

Sign up right now and get in on this incredible opportunity.

Sign up here for Hotjar

Article Pick: SEO Guide to Ads Placement

Where do I put my ads?Ads placement remains a necessary evil for the user experience, threat to Google and marketing revenue darling.

One of my favorite tasks for my old Cre8pc site was bringing attention to good works by people in the SEO and Usability industries. Continuing with that tradition, here is one of my favorite finds.

An SEO Guide to Adsense, Ads and Placement was written in 2011 by Cyrus Shepard and featured on MOZ. When the article came out, it was helpful for many people struggling with ad placement and Google slaps for banners placed above content. Shepard includes mockups of ads placement for “Panda Friendly” page layouts.

I continue to see news and directory sites plastered with banners. That they don’t appear to be punished by Google is curious. And not only from the SEO perspective, since the user experience suffers when content is broken up with ads. The day we all come to web pages for the sole purpose of finding and clicking on ads is the day I retire on a remote island with my own “girly drink” hunky waiter to serve me.

Is there an update to this article? If so, let me know. We all want to earn money and placing ads on pages is not an act of treachery. Do we have the right to place them wherever we want to?

What are your findings?

 

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