I Killed Threadwatch

Not really, but when Aaron Wall closes down Threadwatch and I saw this, I paused to wonder…

Sites that were traditionally mainstream started writing about stories they never would have touched, using titles they never would have in the past.

Okay. It’s not me. I’m too tame. An occasional romp in the hay with headlines containing “sexy women” does not make me a threat to anybody.

Aaron takes Threadwatch down on Friday. He lists his reasons for doing it. Just one:

I am pretty easy to work with and would have had no problem helping spread a lot of the better ones, but when your friends spam your sites with low level junk it is time to change your position or get new friends.

There’s a lot of that going on these days.

6 thoughts on “I Killed Threadwatch”

  1. “There’s a lot of that going on these days.”

    Aw, c’mon, Kim, you can’t say that and then just leave us hanging. There’s BOUND to be a good juicy story behind that statement. Who did what to whom? What flavor of spam was used in this process? LOL. Ok, I suppose you have good reasons for not sharing, but dang, it’s hard to resist asking for details.

  2. Heh.

    If I blabbed, nobody would tell me anything.

    Aaron gave the butler and candlestick clues with “change your position or get new friends”.

    He’s not alone. In an industry where it can be standard procedure to use people and discard them when you no longer need them for your own gain, sooner or later there is a reaction to that.

  3. Do you think that’s just this industry? I think this is the reality across all industries and beyond.

    Even if you’re selfish enough to think that using people is acceptable, how can you say with certainty that this or that person is no longer useful to you?

    Definitely something to think about…

  4. I honestly don’t know Andrey. There are divisions in the usability/human factors camp too, but I haven’t burrowed in deeply enough to know how ugly it may be. Both SEO and Usability industries are divided based on principles, methodology, business practices and expertise levels.

    In marketing, however, the goal is to be out front and do whatever it takes to get there and stay there, even if it means using people and companies and discarding them when you think you’ve reached your goal.

    This is where the rumblings are happening.

  5. I found that statement interesting, too, Kim. I guess I was surprised to see some of the TW spamming going on. Something about honesty and doing the right thing. I’ve had the same experience, though.

    BTW, I’m still trying to poke my nose in at cre8 (I guess you can see that I’m there several times a day), but we’ve just launched a new project, so my slivers of time are getting sliver-ier.

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